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Office of Disability Employment Newsletter (November 22, 2013)

Friday, November 22nd, 2013

Assistant Secretary Martinez Celebrates the Developmental Disabilities Act

At a November 15 event to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Kathy Martinez participated in a panel discussion on employment for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. “We in the Office of Disability Employment Policy believe that a presumption of employability should exist for all people with developmental disabilities,” said Martinez. “And we believe the time is now for our nation to value people with developmental disabilities for the unique skills and talents they bring, and to capitalize on those attributes by integrating them fully into our workplaces.” The meeting was hosted by the White House, the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, and the National Council on Disability,

Delivering on “Thanks for Your Service” — Assistant Secretary Martinez’s Blog

Recognizing November as Military Family Month in her recent blog, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Kathy Martinez also discussed the new Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act (VEVRAA) rule issued by the Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs. “The need for the new rule is clear,” said Martinez. “Like people with disabilities overall, veterans with disabilities are sometimes overlooked by managers with preconceived notions about their ability to perform on the job. Yet, they have given so much in service to their country.”

Discussion Guide for “Because” PSA Now Available

Like all youth, youth with disabilities should grow up expecting to work and succeed. That’s the simple but significant message behind the “Because” public service announcement (PSA) distributed by the ODEP-funded Campaign for Disability Employment (CDE) earlier this year. Now, a discussion guide that can be used to facilitate a conversation about the PSA among adults or youth is available. Free of charge, the guide includes a DVD containing the PSA and is available in both English and Spanish.

Trauma-Informed Approaches Report Released

The “Trauma-informed Approaches: Federal Activities and Initiatives: Federal Partners Committee on Women and Trauma — A Working Document/Second Report” has been released. The report documents the projects, programs, and initiatives of more than three dozen federal agencies, departments, and offices working on these issues. It demonstrates the application of trauma-informed approaches across a wide range of settings and systems and encourages other governmental and nongovernmental agencies to implement a cross-sector, interagency, inter-systems’ realization, recognition, and response to trauma.

CDC Publishes New Poster for World AIDS Day — December 1

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a new poster for World AIDS Day, observed on December 1. The poster encourages everyone to “Get the Facts. Get Tested. Get Involved,” and features information on how to find an HIV/STD testing site. Both print-ready and web-ready versions are available.

2014 Paul G. Hearne AAPD Leadership Awards Applications
Due December 6

The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) will once again recognize outstanding individuals personifying leadership, advocacy, and dedication to and for the disability community at large. Two individuals, emerging as leaders in the cross-disability civil rights movement, will each receive $10,000 to help them continue their progress as leaders and further connect their work with the national grassroots of AAPD. The recipients of the 2014 Hearne Leadership Awards will also have an opportunity to meet and network with national disability leaders at the AAPD Leadership Gala in Washington, DC in March 2014. U.S. residents with any type of disability are eligible to apply. Self-nominations are preferred. Winners will be announced sometime in early January.

For more information, go to www.dol.gov/odep.

Office of Disability Employment Policy Offers Resources for Veterans with Disabilities

Friday, November 22nd, 2013

Next week, many people across America will celebrate Thanksgiving by taking stock of their blessings — friends, family and the freedom to pursue their life and career goals. Fittingly, the holiday takes place during Military Family Month, a time when we express appreciation for the men and women who work to protect that freedom and the many spouses, parents, children and siblings who support them.

One of the best ways to express appreciation for military families is to ensure that uniformed service members — including those who have acquired disabilities — have the opportunity to put their hard-earned skills and real-world experience to work when they transition to civilian life.

In fact, many of the qualities businesses, both large and small, seek in employees — the ability to adapt, learn quickly and get the job done — exemplify veterans, including those with visible or non-visible disabilities. Yet, like people with disabilities overall, veterans with disabilities are often overlooked for jobs, despite many employers’ expressed desire to hire them.

Employers can access a variety of local services to identify qualified veterans, including veterans with disabilities. Of course, it’s also important to support veterans once on the job. To help, the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s Job Accommodation Network (JAN) offers a variety of materials, including information about accommodations that can enhance productivity for veterans with particular conditions.

Useful for businesses of all sizes in all industries, these resources can help foster a veteran-friendly workplace and offer a way to express gratitude — this month and every month — to those who have sacrificed in service in the name of freedom, and to their families.

For additional news and resources, go to www.dol.gov/odep.

Office of Disability Employment Policy Newsletter (November 15, 2013)

Saturday, November 16th, 2013

Assistant Secretary Martinez Discusses Disability and LGBT Issues

At the 14th Annual National Career Opportunities for Students with Disabilities conference in Chicago on November 7, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Kathy Martinez participated in a panel on “Disability and LGBT: Exploring the Gray.” Speaking to a group of major employers, college students and recent graduates, Martinez discussed the intersection between disability and diversity. She noted, “When we make strides toward equality for any community, whether the disability community, the LGBT community, or another historically marginalized population, it benefits all of us.”

Chicago Mayor’s Office on People with Disabilities Welcomes Assistant Secretary Martinez

Addressing 400 Illinois high school students with disabilities at a November 8 event in Chicago celebrating Disability Mentoring Day, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Kathy Martinez stressed the significance of job training and mentorship for youth with disabilities. “I believe that, in order to effectively prepare for the world of work, young people with disabilities – like all young people – must have the opportunity to explore their career interests through first-hand experience,” noted Martinez. “And they must be able to observe and learn from older, more experienced workers.” The Chicago Mayor’s Office on People with Disabilities hosted the event, which included a “Dress for Success” fashion show.

Assistant Secretary Martinez Addresses College Students in Denver

Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Kathy Martinez spoke to students and community members in Denver on November 12 at a disability awareness event sponsored by the University of Colorado Denver, Community College of Denver and Metropolitan State University of Denver. Martinez emphasized the importance of empowerment, self-sufficiency and independence for people with disabilities, and the role that students with disabilities can play in achieving these goals. “I am thrilled to know that the future is in good hands with the next generation of leaders coming up the ranks,” said Martinez. “Because the work you do to raise awareness about disability issues helps foster more inclusive environments, not just here on your campus, but in the wider community.”

Final Rule Issued for Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act

A final rule has been issued for the Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA) by the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and the Treasury. The final rule ensures parity between mental health/substance use disorder benefits and medical/surgical benefits in group and individual health plans. The MHPAEA rule becomes applicable on July 1, 2014.

December 1 Marks World AIDS Day

“Shared Responsibility: Strengthening Results for an AIDS-Free Generation” is the 2013 theme of World AIDS Day, observed on December 1. The AIDS.gov website offers many ways to get involved including participating in the “Facing AIDS” initiative. “Facing AIDS” aims to reduce stigma and promote HIV testing by showing the faces of real people who share why they are facing AIDS. AIDS.gov also offers a variety of posters, many of them customizable, which can be downloaded from the site.

LEAD Center Announces Monthly “Policy Update – Health Care, Employment and Disability” Publication

Focused on the intersection of disability, employment and health care policy, the LEAD Center’s “Policy Update – Health Care, Employment and Disability” publication is intended to provide policymakers, disability service professionals, individuals with disabilities and their families with information about relevant policy developments regarding Medicaid, the Affordable Care Act and related topics, with an emphasis on improving employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. Each monthly update will be published to the Resource Center found on the LEAD Center website.

Bureau of Labor Statistics Releases Youth Employment Rate Numbers for October 2013

“Employment data for youth with and without disabilities is obtained from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of households conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Assistant Secretary Martinez Discusses Disability and Higher Education

Speaking to a group of scholars and disability activists at a higher education conference at the University of Delaware in Newark on October 26, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Kathy Martinez stressed the importance of creating a culture of inclusion for employees with disabilities, especially regarding disability disclosure. Martinez further noted the significance for students with disabilities of seeing faculty and staff with disabilities who can serve as role models and mentors. “Of course we all need to see ourselves reflected in society,” she said, “so for students seeing a person with a disability in a mentoring role, it truly is very impactful.”

Assistant Secretary Martinez Addresses the Importance of Identity

Emphasizing that all workers “whole selves” are made up of multiple identities, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Kathy Martinez told a group of 100 corporate employees at PepsiCo headquarters in Chicago on November 6 that it benefits employers to understand and embrace this fact. “All of these identities add value to your organization by creating an amalgam of opinions and insight,” said Martinez, “and when it comes to solving problems and achieving success, that’s exactly what’s needed.” The audience included PepsiCo employee resource group members, as well as members from the Out & Equal Chicagoland partner organizations.

EEOC Holds Public Meeting on National Origin Bias: A Summary of the Meeting (November 15, 2013)

Friday, November 15th, 2013

On Wednesday, November 13, 2013, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission held a public meeting on the issue of national origin-based discrimination in the workplace at its headquarters in Washington, DC.

A variety of advocacy groups and non-profit organizations participated alongside federal sector officials and counsel from private law firms. The range of topics included discriminatory treatment in a variety of areas related to national origin such as job assignments, pay inequity, recruitment, hiring, harassment, retaliation, and issues related to language and/or accent.

As one of six areas of priority in its strategic enforcement plan, the EEOC identified issues affecting immigrants, migrants, and other vulnerable worker populations that suffer national origin-based discrimination. Headed by EEOC General Counsel David Lopez, and Lead Coordinator Administrative Judge Lucilia Rosas, in 2011 the EEOC established an in-house team to address discriminatory practices, particularly with regard to immigrants, migrants, and other vulnerable workers such as victims of human trafficking. Education and outreach efforts have been ramped-up in areas with populations where English is spoken little or not at all. Materials and resources developed by the EEOC team are available in Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Russian, Vietnamese, and Haitian-Creole.

National origin-based discrimination may occur in a variety of ways, including the use of screening tools by employers such as English-only requirements, or citizenship status, to exclude individuals from employment. Attendees stated the EEOC should provide clearer guidance that such screening tools or exclusionary job requirements should not be utilized absent a showing of “business necessity.” And, the EEOC should provide concrete examples of when English-only requirements are, and are not, appropriate. Given competing priorities, representatives of the EEOC were uncertain whether updated guidance on national origin-based discrimination would be forthcoming anytime soon.

And, problems associated with “job segregation” were discussed. In “job segregation,” immigrants, migrants, and other vulnerable workers are placed in positions that involve little or no customer contact. Typically, these segregated jobs offer less pay, and less opportunity for promotion or advancement. It was noted that, often in these situations, the employer cites to its “corporate image,” or presumed “customer preference,” for the segregation. The concept of “intersectional discrimination” also was discussed; that is, certain individuals may be the victims of discrimination on multiple bases such as religion, color, or race in addition to national origin.

Finally, “code switching” was discussed. This is where a bilingual employee changes from speaking English to his or her native language, which is a common occurrence for bilingual employees. Attendees encouraged the EEOC to develop guidance making clear that “code switching” should not serve as the basis for disciplining an employee.

Attendees of the meeting encouraged the EEOC to update its guidance in this area, and be more proactive in addressing national origin-based discrimination. Given the rapidly changing demographics of the country, it was agreed that this issue probably will take on greater prominence in the years to come.

For more information, go to www.eeoc.gov.

Best Practice Standards: The Proper Use of Criminal Records in Hiring

Friday, November 8th, 2013

On May 21, 2013, the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law announced a publication, “Best Practice Standards: The Proper Use of Criminal Records in Hiring.” The following is an excerpt from the publication, which was developed by a working group of experts from the Legal Action Center, the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, the National Workrights Institute in consultation with private sector consultants from the Employment Screening Resources and CARCO Group, Incorporated:

    Introduction

Hiring new employees is a critically important function in any business, government agency, or non-profit organization. Every hiring decision represents a major investment that employers must make with limited information. Checking criminal history is just a small part of this process, which may also include verifying education, prior employment and other reference information. The Best Practice Standards in this document will help employers properly weigh adverse personal history to find those applicants who will contribute most to the productivity of the organization.

Responsible hiring practices should incorporate the recommendations made by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the agency that enforces federal employment discrimination laws, in its 2012 “Enforcement Guidance on the Use of Arrest and Conviction Records in Employment Decisions under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.” The Best Practice Standards presented here set out concrete, practical procedures that will help employers make hiring decisions that:

• Comply with the EEOC Guidance and limit liability under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and state and local anti-discrimination laws;
• Comply with the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA); and
• Minimize the risk of liability from hiring an unfit employee.

As the EEOC Guidance pointed out, proper use of criminal history data begins with looking at the risks that arise from the nature of the job. Starting with the job description for the position, the Standards give examples of questions about risks associated with the job that will identify the kinds of prior convictions that are relevant. This is the first determination the employer makes in developing what is called a “Relevance Screen,” which lays out which convictions should be considered in the hiring process.

The second determination for the Relevance Screen is the length of time to consider convictions, referred to in these Standards as the “look-back” period. Some states have statutes that limit this period for many jobs. Where no state limitation applies, if research data is available to guide the employer on how long to consider convictions, the EEOC Guidance recommends using that research. The employer must make an informed judgment about how long to consider convictions.

When applying the Relevance Screen, only convictions and pending prosecutions should be considered. Arrests that are not subject to active prosecution should not be considered. In states that do not allow consideration of any arrests whatsoever, the state law must be followed.

When a criminal background check is necessary, the employer should engage the services of an experienced Consumer Reporting Agency (CRA). The employer should select the CRA based on its knowledge, expertise and thoroughness, not primarily on low cost. The employer should insist that the CRA (1) be sure that all information is confirmed from the original source, not from private industry databases; (2) report convictions only when full name and all other available identifiers match; (3) be sure the disposition is current; and (4) report all charges related to a single incident as a single entry.

While there are exceptions, job postings or announcements generally should not refer to criminal background checks, and the application form should not require candidates to list convictions. Many large organizations, including most federal government agencies, do not inquire about criminal history at the interview, but defer the criminal background check until after the employer has decided to make an offer of employment. Other employers may inquire about criminal history at the interview, which is consistent with these Standards as long as the inquiry is limited to convictions of the type and within the period identified by the Relevance Screen.

If the leading candidate for the job has no convictions described by the types and dates determined for the Relevance Screen, the hiring decision is complete. But the leading candidate may have a conviction within the parameters of the Relevance Screen. Then the employer needs to assure that the final hiring decision is made by a manager who can balance the competing factors in order to give no more weight to the conviction than is truly appropriate for the risk. This may be the manager who supervises the position, or it may have to be a member of senior management.

In making the final decision, the manager should follow the recommendation of the EEOC Guidance to consider all evidence relevant to rehabilitation and low risk of future misconduct. A list of many of the types of relevant evidence is included in Appendix A of the Standards.

Employers must remember that millions of workers with prior convictions have turned their lives around and become productive members of society. These workers are disproportionately from minority communities. Employers need to follow sensible procedures in considering the past conviction records of job applicants, since failing to do so will both hurt the employer’s interests and risk discriminating against productive workers of every heritage. Following the Best Practice Standards set forth here will enable employers to protect their interests and the interests of those they serve, without unduly burdening applicants for past mistakes.

    Best practices

1. CONSIDER ONLY CONVICTIONS AND PENDING PROSECUTIONS

The fact that someone has been charged with a crime should not disqualify them for a job if they were not convicted. If a person is being prosecuted for an offense that is relevant to a job for which they have applied, an employer may consider it.

2. CONSIDER ONLY CONVICTIONS THAT ARE RELEVANT TO THE JOB IN QUESTION

A person who has committed an illegal act in the past may be more likely than the average person to commit a similar act in the future, but they are no more likely to commit other offenses. A person who has been convicted of DUI may put the public at risk in a job that involves driving, but not in other jobs.

3. CONSIDER ONLY CONVICTIONS RECENT ENOUGH TO INDICATE SIGNIFICANT RISK

The risk that someone who has been convicted of a crime will commit another offense decreases over time. Employers should consider the available evidence on recidivism rates before rejecting an applicant.

4. DO NOT ASK ABOUT CRIMINAL RECORDS ON APPLICATION FORMS

Delaying learning about an applicant’s criminal record until the interview or later enables the employer to make more informed hiring decisions.

5. USE A QUALIFIED CRA TO CONDUCT RECORD CHECKS

All consumer reporting agencies are not equal. Employers should consider the quality of CRAs’ procedures and results and not decide which one to use based solely upon cost.

6. CRAS SHOULD REPORT ONLY CONVICTIONS THAT ARE RELEVANT AND RECENT

Employers should determine in advance the convictions that it considers relevant for specific jobs and the time period during which they are relevant. These determinations should be provided to the CRA with instruction to report only convictions that meet these criteria.

7. REPORT CONVICTIONS ONLY WHEN FULL NAME AND ONE OTHER IDENTIFIER MATCH

In a country of over 300 million people, many people have the same first and last name. A conviction should only be reported to an employer when the full name (including middle name where available) and at least one other identified match.

8. CONFIRM ALL INFORMATION FROM ONLINE DATABASES WITH ORIGINAL SOURCE

Online databases are not always accurate or up to date. All information from such databases should be confirmed with the original source.

9. GET CURRENT DISPOSITION OF ALL RELEVANT INFORMATION

All information obtained from any source should be updated to ensure that it is current.

10. PROVIDE APPLICANT THE OPPORTUNITY TO CHALLENGE THE CRA’S REPORT

Whether or not required to do so by FCRA, employers should provide applicants with a prompt and convenient method of challenging information in the CRA’s report.

11. ALL CHARGES RELATED TO A SINGLE INCIDENT SHOULD BE REPORTED AS A SINGLE ENTRY

Reporting information relating to a single incident in different sections of a report can create the impression that multiple incidents took place. All information related to a single incident should be reported in a single entry.

12. CONSIDER EVIDENCE OF REHABILITATION

People change over time. Some people with criminal convictions change their lives and become good citizens who can be good employees. Applicants with relevant convictions recent enough to be of concern should not automatically be rejected. Instead, he or she should be given the opportunity to present evidence of rehabilitation which the employer should carefully consider before making a decision.

13. MINIMIZE CONFLICT OF INTEREST BY DECISION MAKERS

Employees making hiring decisions regarding applicants with criminal records are in a difficult situation. If the company hires an applicant with a record who later commits another offense, the employee who hired them may be blamed. Hiring decisions should be made by an employee (or employees) who are in the best position to make an objective decision.

14. TRAIN HUMAN RESOURCES STAFF

Hiring decisions regarding applicants with criminal records require an understanding of the practical steps an employer should take to comply with federal and state law on background checks and to comply with federal, state and local anti-discrimination laws, without exposing the employer to unreasonable risks. Human resources employees should be thoroughly trained on these subjects.

15. HAVE A DIVERSITY PROGRAM

One of the benefits of making sound decisions regarding applicants with criminal records is a more diverse workforce. Having a diversity program helps an employer determine how well it is making such decisions.

The full text of the publication may be found at the following website address:

http://www.lawyerscommittee.org/admin/employment_discrimination/documents/files/Best-Practices-Standards-The-Proper-Use-of-Criminal-Records-in-Hiring.pdf

Office of Disability Employment Newsletter (November 8, 2013)

Friday, November 8th, 2013

Assistant Secretary Martinez Discusses Disability and Higher Education

Speaking to a group of scholars and disability activists at a higher education conference at the University of Delaware in Newark on October 26, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Kathy Martinez stressed the importance of creating a culture of inclusion for employees with disabilities, especially regarding disability disclosure. Martinez further noted the significance for students with disabilities of seeing faculty and staff with disabilities who can serve as role models and mentors. “Of course we all need to see ourselves reflected in society,” she said, “so for students seeing a person with a disability in a mentoring role, it truly is very impactful.”

Assistant Secretary Martinez Addresses the Importance of Identity

Emphasizing that all workers “whole selves” are made up of multiple identities, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Kathy Martinez told a group of 100 corporate employees at PepsiCo headquarters in Chicago on November 6 that it benefits employers to understand and embrace this fact. “All of these identities add value to your organization by creating an amalgam of opinions and insight,” said Martinez, “and when it comes to solving problems and achieving success, that’s exactly what’s needed.” The audience included PepsiCo employee resource group members, as well as members from the Out & Equal Chicagoland partner organizations.

EARN Archives National Disability Employment Awareness Month Webinars

The Employer Assistance and Resource Network (EARN) has archived two of its October webinars for National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). The topics highlighted in these 30-minute presentations include mental health and disability disclosure, and are presented by experts in the field.

National Council on Disability Releases Annual Survey of Federal Disability Policy

The National Council on Disability (NCD), an independent federal agency that recommends disability policy to the President, Congress and other federal agencies, has released the “2013 Progress Report: Strength in Our Differences,” its annual report on federal disability policy. The report is derived from interviews with the diverse segments of the disability community and is organized in four topic areas: Ratification of the Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities, Economic Empowerment, Health Care and Access to Medical Treatment, and Community Integration.

For more information, go to www.dol.gov/odep.

Office of Disability Employment Policy Newsletter (November 1, 2013)

Friday, November 1st, 2013

Assistant Secretary Martinez Pens Blog on Career Exploration for Youth

In her blog post “Career Exploration: A Critical Experience for All Youth,” assistant secretary of labor for disability employment policy Kathy Martinez explores the importance of programs like Disability Mentoring Day, which is dedicated to helping youth with disabilities learn about work and the potential opportunities that are waiting for them. “After all, having grown up with a disability, I simply wouldn’t be who I am today without the many mentors I had to help guide me and the real-world opportunities I had to explore my interests and potential, starting from a young age,” notes Martinez. She also discusses the results of the National Online Dialogue hosted in May 2013 by the US Departments of Labor, Education, and Health and Human Services and the Social Security Administration, which sought input from a variety of stakeholders on ways to align policies, programs, and practices in support of successful transition for youth with disabilities.

Assistant Secretary Martinez Visits California and Minnesota

On a three-city tour, assistant secretary of labor for disability employment policy Kathy Martinez spoke to audiences at events focused on different aspects of the disability employment experience. On October 24, in Berkeley, CA, she addressed the 2013 Policy Summit on Accessible Technology in the Workplace, where she announced ODEP’s new technical assistance center for employers and technology developers — the Partnership on Employment and Accessible Technology (PEAT). While visiting Twitter headquarters in San Francisco, CA, on October 29, Martinez emphasized the importance of accessible social media content, saying “Organizations are increasingly using social media to conduct outreach, recruit job candidates and encourage workplace productivity. But not all social media content is accessible to people with certain disabilities, which limits the reach and effectiveness of your platforms.” Finally, on October 30, in Minneapolis, MN, at the Out and Equal in the Workplace Summit, the assistant secretary opened a panel discussion about the value that diversity brings to America’s workplaces. “By fostering corporate cultures respectful of individual differences, businesses benefit from varied perspectives that contribute to innovation and success,” Martinez explained.

LEAD Center Issues Executive Summary on First Annual Policy Roundtable

The LEAD Center issued an executive summary of its First Annual Policy Roundtable held this past July in Washington, D.C. The LEAD Center Policy Roundtable brought together federal agency leaders, state and local policymakers and practitioners, and subject-matter experts to create a progressive vision that promotes the effective leveraging of resources to improve employment and economic advancement of youth and adults with disabilities.

Job Accommodation Network Releases Training Module on JAN Resources in Spanish

The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) has published a Just-in-Time training module on “All About JAN: Resources in Spanish”/ “Todo acerca de JAN para hispanohablantes.” The 18 minute training module and accompanying transcript and handout provide an overview of JAN’s services in Spanish, which include technical assistance via phone, email, chat and social media, as well as publications and other materials.

For more information, go to www.dol.gov/odep.