RSS Feed!

Archives

Posts Tagged ‘webinar’

The “Basis” of a Discrimination Complaint: What It Is and Why It’s Important by Seena Foster

Friday, June 15th, 2018

A discrimination complaint is filed when someone feels that s/he has been unfairly or unjustly treated as compared to someone else. Sometimes, the person believes that a process or criteria has been inefficiently or inconsistently applied to him or her as compared to another person.

There may be any number of reasons for the alleged differing treatment, yet only certain reasons are prohibited by law. The reason for alleged differing treatment constitutes the complaint’s “basis” or, in the case of multiple reasons, the “bases” of discrimination.

Why is the “basis” of a discrimination complaint important to the Equal Opportunity (EO) professional? It is one of the critical factors used in determining whether a violation of applicable civil rights laws has been alleged. While it is true that any form of discriminatory conduct or preferential treatment is offensive and unfair, not all conduct is illegal.

Federally-funded programs and activities

Prohibited bases of discrimination in federally-funded programs and activities are established by statute. For example, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 provides that race, color, and national origin are illegal bases of discrimination. Disability is another prohibited basis of discrimination pursuant to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008. The Age Discrimination Act of 1975 prohibits discrimination on the basis of age—any age.

While the foregoing statutes set forth prohibited bases of discrimination across the board in federally-funded programs and activities, there are certain statutes delineating additional prohibited bases of discrimination, which are applicable to specific types of programs and activities. For instance, Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972 (Title IX) prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex or gender in federally-funded educational programs and activities. And, one of the most expansive civil rights laws applies to certain workforce development programs and activities. Notably, Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014 prohibits discrimination on the previously-mentioned bases of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and gender. And, it contains the following additional prohibited bases of discrimination: religion, political affiliation or belief, citizenship, and WIOA-participant status.

To illustrate the concept of “basis” and its importance, we’ll look at a couple of examples. First, let’s assume that Michelle wants to enroll in a GED program at a nearby public college, which receives WIOA-related funding from the U.S. Department of Labor as well as financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Education. The admissions officer of the college does not permit Michelle to complete the enrollment form because Michelle has been pregnant five times in the past seven years. Michelle files a complaint. Here, Michelle has filed a complaint alleging gender-based discrimination; that is, Michelle alleges that she is subjected to discrimination (not allowed to enroll) because of her history of pregnancies and, since pregnancy is unique to women, this is an allegation of gender-based discrimination. Because the college operates its programs and activities using federal dollars, the delivery of these educational programs and activities is governed by Title IX, which prohibits gender-based discrimination. And, gender-based discrimination at this college also is prohibited under WIOA Section 188. So, Michelle’s complaint alleges illegal discrimination.

Now, let’s turn to Joe, who alleges that he is being denied on-the-job-training through a WIOA-funded American Job Network center because he is homeless. If we look at the prohibited “bases” of discrimination under WIOA Section 188, we see that “homelessness” is not listed. Undoubtedly, discrimination against a person because s/he is homeless is offensive and unfair, but the WIOA EO professional does not have authority to investigate Joe’s complaint under WIOA Section 188 because his complaint does not allege a “basis” of discrimination prohibited by those laws.

If you are an EO professional for your agency, organization, or company, you must know the civil rights laws that apply to your federally-funded programs and activities. Review these laws to determine the prohibited “bases” of discrimination in the delivery of your programs and activities. If you receive a discrimination complaint, you will need to ensure that the alleged basis of discrimination is prohibited by one or more civil rights laws governing your programs and activities before you consider accepting the complaint for investigation.

In the workplace

If you are an EEO/AA/HR professional in the workplace, you also will need to know the federal, state, and local civil rights laws applicable to workplace discrimination. As with laws governing federally-funded programs and activities, civil rights laws governing the workplace will delineate certain prohibited “bases” of discrimination. These workplace “bases” include age (40 years of age and over), disability, equal compensation, genetic information, national origin, sex (including pregnancy and sexual harassment), race, color, and religion.

As an example, 46-year-old Mario alleges he was transferred to a less desirable office location and, recently, he has been excluded from monthly management meetings as compared to a 28-year-old colleague who continues to attend the meetings and occupies a highly, sought-after office location in the company. Here, Mario has filed an age-based discrimination complaint, and you would have authority to investigate that complaint under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act.

On the other hand, Joan files a discrimination complaint alleging that her supervisor does not like her and gave her a poor performance review because she is vocal in her disagreement with the supervisor’s policies. This complaint does not allege any “basis” of discrimination prohibited by federal or state civil rights laws. Notably, “personality conflicts,” “policy differences,” or “disagreements” are not among the prohibited bases of discrimination in the workplace. As a result, you would not have authority to investigate Joan’s complaint.

Conclusion

As an EO professional, it will save you time to make a list of the prohibited “bases” of discrimination under the civil rights laws applicable to your federally-funded programs and activities. For the EEO/AA/HR professional, you’ll need to have a clear understanding of the civil rights laws applicable to your employment practices. This knowledge, in turn, will help you quickly assess whether a complaint alleges illegal discrimination. For complaints that allege discrimination on a prohibited basis, you must ensure all other jurisdictional requirements are met prior to accepting the complaint for investigation. For complaints that do not allege discrimination on a prohibited basis, you do not have jurisdiction to investigate the complaint under federal civil rights laws, but you may determine that issues raised in the complaint may be addressed informally (such as by taking steps to address customer service issues in the delivery of federally-funded programs and activities), or through the non-discrimination grievance process in place at your agency, organization, or company for workplace-related complaints.

About Seena Foster

Seena Foster, award-winning civil rights author and Principal of the discrimination consulting firm, Title VI Consulting, LLP in Alexandria, Virginia, provides expertise and guidance in the areas of compliance and civil rights investigations to state and local governments, colleges and universities, private companies, and non-profit organizations. To that end, she offers on-demand webcasts, full-day and half-day in-person training sessions, assistance developing procedures, and mediation services addressing a variety of types of discrimination such as racial discrimination, sex discrimination, disability discrimination, age discrimination, and religious discrimination. The federal law on discrimination is complex and affects our workplaces as well as the delivery of our federally-funded programs and activities. Her book, “Civil Rights Investigations Under the Workforce Investment Act and Other Title VI Related Laws: From Intake to Final Determination,” has been described as an “eye-opening” reading experience and a “stand-alone” training resource. Ms. Foster’s resources and materials are designed to support the work of civil rights and discrimination professionals in the public and private sectors. To learn more about Ms. Foster, and the services she has to offer, go to www.titleviconsulting.com.

Harassment and Hostile Environment: Understanding the Basics by Seena Foster

Tuesday, May 15th, 2018

If you are the Equal Opportunity (EO) professional charged with ensuring nondiscrimination in the delivery of federally-funded programs and activities, or you serve as the Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Human Resources (EEO/AA/HR) professional charged with ensuring nondiscrimination in the workplace, you must have a working knowledge of “harassment” and “hostile environment.”

√ Two categories of harassment-related complaints.

Let’s start with an understanding that complaints of harassment-related discrimination fall into one of two categories: (1) quid pro quo harassment; or (2) hostile environment harassment.

Whether a complaint involves allegations of quid pro quo harassment or hostile environment, the conduct must be “unwelcome.” And, who defines whether conduct is “unwelcome”? Harassment is defined “through the eyes of the beholder”; namely, the person subjected to the harassing conduct defines whether the conduct is offensive and unwelcome.

√ Harassment is discrimination.

“Harassment” and “hostile environment” constitute forms of discrimination, regardless of whether the “harassment” or “hostile environment” occurs in federally-funded programs and activities, or in the workplace.

When we hear the word “harassment,” many of us first think of “sexual” harassment. To be sure, harassment on the basis of “sex” is a form of sex discrimination that is barred by federal law in the workplace, and in the delivery of federally-funded services, aid, training, and benefits.

That being said, it is equally important to keep in mind that harassment or hostile environment may occur on any prohibited basis of discrimination, including race, national origin, color, disability, age, and others. For example, you may see a complaint of race-based hostile environment, or a religion-based quid pro quo harassment complaint.

√ Quid pro quo harassment defined.

In the simplest of terms, quid pro quo harassment takes the form of bartering—“you give me this, and I’ll give you that.” A workplace example occurs where Jane, a supervisor, offers her assistant, Jason, a bonus in exchange for sexual favors. Jane has engaged in prohibited quid pro quo sexual harassment. Notably, Jane’s decision-making regarding whether to give Jason a bonus should be based on bona fide work-related criteria, not through bartering to get Jason to have sex with her.

Similarly, an example in the arena of federally-funded programs and activities is where Scott, the employment-referral counselor at a job bank, refuses to refer Khalid to available security guard positions unless Khalid renounces his Islamic faith. Here, Scott has engaged in quid pro quo religious-based harassment—Khalid must give up his Islamic faith in exchange for referral to the security guard positions. This discrimination is illegal because Scott is obligated to base his decision to refer Khalid to security guard positions on whether Khalid meets the essential eligibility requirements for the referral, not Khalid’s religious beliefs or practices.

√ “Hostile environment” defined.

Turning to “hostile environment,” this type of discrimination does not involve the bartering of “you give me this and I’ll give you that.” Rather, a hostile environment is created where one person, or a group of people, engages in offensive conduct that is “so severe and pervasive” that it adversely alters another person’s workplace environment, or the person’s enjoyment of, and participation in, federally-funded programs and activities.

In determining whether conduct is “severe and pervasive,” the following factors should be considered: (1) the frequency of the conduct; (2) the severity of the conduct; (3) whether the conduct is physically threatening or humiliating, or a mere offensive utterance; and (4) whether the conduct unreasonably interferes with an employee’s job performance, or with a person’s participation in, or enjoyment of, a federally-funded program or activity.

An example of “hostile environment” in the workplace is where Kristen works as a welder alongside eight co-workers, all of whom are men. Two of these co-workers are constantly telling sexist jokes, posting naked photos of women in the work area, and whistling at Kristen when she is working. Kristen is offended by the conduct, and she lets her co-workers know that it is unwelcome. When the conduct does not stop, Kristen files a complaint. Kristen’s complaint involves allegations of a “hostile sexual environment,” which adversely altered her working conditions.

In federally-funded programs and activities, an example of hostile environment occurs where a group of students at a public school posts derogatory remarks on Facebook about Josh, a student with a mobility disability. Moreover, they call him “crippled” and “stupid” in the hallways of the school, and deliberately place obstacles in front of his power chair. Josh files a disability-based hostile environment complaint. Here, the offending group of students created a “disability-based hostile environment” that, in turn, adversely altered Josh’s ability to enjoy, and participate in, the educational programs and activities offered at the school.

√ Retaliatory “hostile environment” is against the law.

Whether in the workplace, or in federally-funded programs and activities, creating a “hostile environment” against an individual in retaliation for filing an EEO complaint, or in retaliation for filing a discrimination complaint in a federally-funded program, also is prohibited. Every circuit court addressing this issue recognizes these complaints of “retaliatory hostile environment.”

If a person files a discrimination complaint, regardless of whether the complaint is ultimately successful or not, and then the person experiences “severe and pervasive” harassment from any member of your organization’s staff, your organization and the responsible staff members will be held liable. See Clegg v. Ark. Dep’t. of Corr., 496 F.3d 922 (8th Cir. 2007); Jordan v. City of Cleveland, 464 F.3d 584 (6th Cir. 2006); Jensen v. Potter, 435 F.3d 444 (3rd Cir. 2006), abrogated on other grounds by Burlington N. & Santa Fe Ry. Co. v. White, 548 U.S. 53 (2006); Hussain v. Nicholson, 435 F.3d 359 (D.C. Cir. 2006); Noviello v. City of Boston, 398 F.3d 76 (1st Cir. 2005); Von Gunten v. Maryland, 243 F.3d 858 (4th Cir. 2001), abrogated on other grounds by Burlington N., 548 U.S. 53; Ray v. Henderson, 217 F.3d 1234 (9th Cir. 2000); Richardson v. N.Y. State Dep’t. of Corr. Serv., 180 F.3d 426 (2nd Cir. 1999), abrogated on other grounds by Burlington N., 548 U.S. 53; Gunnell v. Utah Valley State Coll., 152 F.3d 1253 (10th Cir. 1998); Knox v. Indiana, 93 F.3d 1327 (7th Cir. 1996).

For example, in Gowski v. James Peake, MD (Sec’y., Dept. of Veterans Affairs, et al), 682 F.3d 1299 (11th Cir. 2012), the circuit court noted, after two hospital physician-employees filed EEO complaints of gender-based and religious-based discrimination, they were subjected to “severe and pervasive” retaliation at work, including the spread of demeaning rumors about the physicians by management that damaged their professional reputations, denial of hospital privileges to the physicians that could adversely affect their certifications, excluding the physicians from participating in work-related functions, and other similar acts. The court found, taken as a whole, this conduct created a retaliatory hostile environment, and damages were awarded against the hospital.

√ Obligations of EO and EEO professionals.

Thus, whether you work as an EO professional in federally-funded programs and activities, or as an EEO/AA/HR professional handling workplace discrimination, you must be familiar with the policies and procedures of your agency or organization pertaining to harassment and hostile environment. If no policies or procedures are in place, you must ensure that they are developed and published. Management and employees in your workplace, as well as beneficiaries and potential beneficiaries of your federally-funded programs and activities must have notice of these policies and procedures.

If you receive a discrimination complaint based on harassment or hostile environment, you are required to take action. These complaints are fact-intensive and there may be more than one appropriate response to a particular complaint of harassment. Although only hindsight offers perfect clarity of what worked and what did not, doing nothing is never acceptable.

About the author.

Seena Foster, award-winning civil rights author and Principal of the discrimination consulting firm, Title VI Consulting, LLP in Alexandria, Virginia, provides expertise and guidance in the areas of civil rights compliance and discrimination complaint investigations related to the delivery of federally-assisted workforce development programs and activities. Her customers include state and local governments, colleges and universities, private companies, private counsel, and non-profit organizations. You may contact her at seena@titleviconsulting.com, or visit her web site at www.titleviconsulting.com for additional information regarding the services and resources she offers.

By way of background, in 2003, Ms. Foster served as a Senior Policy Analyst to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Civil Rights Center (CRC). In that capacity, she led a team of equal opportunity specialists to conduct disability-based technical assistance reviews of One-Stop centers, and she assisted the CRC’s leadership in preparing for limited English proficiency-based compliance reviews. Ms. Foster also analyzed and weighed witness statements and documents to prepare numerous final determinations for signature by the CRC Director, which resolved discrimination complaints under a variety of federal civil rights laws such as Title VI of the Civil Rights Act, the Age Discrimination Act, the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and Section 188 of the Workforce Investment Act. In 2006, Ms. Foster received the Secretary of Labor’s Equal Employment Opportunity Award in recognition of “exceptional efforts to ensure that individuals with disabilities have full access to employment and related services and benefits at the Nation’s One-Stop Career Centers.” And, at the request of the CRC, Ms. Foster served as a popular workshop speaker at national equal opportunity forums co-sponsored by the CRC and the National Association of State Workforce Agencies. Her presentations covered topics such as the WIA Section 188 disability checklist, conducting discrimination complaint investigations and writing final determinations, and conducting investigations of allegations involving harassment and hostile environment.

With a passion for ensuring nondiscrimination and equal opportunity in the delivery of federally-assisted programs and activities, Ms. Foster remains highly active in the field through her series of on-demand webcasts for equal opportunity professionals as well as through her mediation services, training, and assistance developing policies and procedures designed to ensure compliance with applicable federal civil rights laws. Her training in the areas of compliance and complaint investigations has been described as “dynamic,” “hitting the nail on the head,” “well-organized,” and “informative.” And, her award-winning book on conducting discrimination complaint investigations is viewed as “eye-opening” and “the best on the market.” In 2007, Ms. Foster was certified as a mediator by the Virginia Supreme Court, and later obtained “Federal Workplace Mediation” certification through the Northern Virginia Mediation Service.

She is a member of the Discrimination Law and Human Rights Law Committees of the International Bar Association. Ms. Foster received her undergraduate degree from Michigan State University, and she has a Juris Doctorate from The George Washington University Law School.

Harassment at Colleges and Universities: An Overview of Policies and Preventative Measures

Tuesday, January 1st, 2013

One of the most productive ways to prevent harassment and hostile environment on your campus is developing and (regularly) publishing policies and procedures related to handling these types of complaints. Ms. Foster offers a one-hour webinar designed to help you navigate the process of developing effective methods of operating.

Date: Thursday, January 17, 2013

Time: 1:00 pm Eastern Standard Time

Cost: $34.95

Description:

In the course of this webinar, we will define quid pro quo harassment and hostile environment and explore the policies and preventative measures colleges and universities can develop and implement to curb these forms of discrimination. Numerous federal civil rights laws are at issue, including (1) Title IX of the Education Amendments Act (Title IX), which prohibits gender-based discrimination in educational programs and activities, (2) Title VI of the Civil Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination on the bases of race, color, and national origin, (3) the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans With Disabilities Act and their amendments, which prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability, and (4) the Age Discrimination Act, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of any age. Quid pro quo harassment and hostile environment (including bullying) constitute forms of discrimination, and a college or university that fails to properly and adequately respond to such allegations violates federal civil rights law, and is at risk of losing its federal assistance. This federal assistance includes grants, loans, and tuition payments made with federal funds, to name a few examples. Through the webinar, we’ll cover some nuts-and-bolts policies, procedures, and preventative measures any college or university can develop to properly address allegations of harassment and minimize its occurrence.

Developed for:

This webinar is designed for equal opportunity, human resource, and affirmative action personnel at educational institutions as well as the leadership, policy-makers, legal advisors, faculty, staff, and students at these institutions.

About Seena Foster.

Seena Foster, award winning civil rights author and Partner of the discrimination consulting firm, Title VI Consulting, LLP in Alexandria, Virginia, provides expertise and guidance in the areas of compliance and civil rights investigations to state and local governments, colleges and universities, private companies, and non-profit organizations. To that end, she offers one hour webinars, full-day and half-day in-person training sessions, and mediation services addressing a variety of types of discrimination such as racial discrimination, sex discrimination, disability discrimination, age discrimination, and religious discrimination. The federal law on discrimination is complex and affects our workplaces as well as the delivery of our federally funded programs and activities. Her book, Civil Rights Investigations Under the Workforce Investment Act and Other Title VI Related Laws: From Intake to Final Determination, has been described as an “eye-opening” reading experience and a “stand-alone” training resource. Ms. Foster’s resources and materials are designed to support the work of civil rights and discrimination professionals in the public and private sectors. You may contact her through www.titleviconsulting.com.

Attorney Seena Foster, Award Winning Author Of ‘Civil Rights Investigations’, Announces New Sexual Harassment Webinar For Personnel At Educational Institutions

Monday, October 8th, 2012

photo of Seena Foster

The recurring training webinar titled ‘Sexual Harassment at Educational Institutions: An Overview of Policies and Preventive Measures’, provides information for equal opportunity, human resource, and affirmative action personnel at colleges and universities as well as the leadership, policy-makers, faculty, staff, and students

[Washington DC October 8, 2012] Seena Foster, attorney and award winning author of ‘Civil Rights Investigations Under The Workforce Investment Act And Other Title VI-Related Laws’, recently announced the next date for ‘Sexual Harassment at Educational Institutions: An Overview of Policies and Preventive Measures’, an online webinar that provides information on developing policies and implementing preventative measures to prevent sexual harassment at educational institutions. The webinar will be presented on Thursday, October 25, 2012 at 1pm EST.

In the course of this webinar, Ms. Foster will use the sexual harassment case involving Jerry Sandusky and Penn State as an example of some concrete steps any educational institution can take in developing policies and implementing specific measures to address and prevent sexual harassment. The events leading up to the conviction of Mr. Sandusky involved use of university facilities to engage in sexual behavior with minors. The scope of this webinar, however, will be broader. Title IX of the Education Amendments Act (Title IX) prohibits gender-based discrimination in federally assisted educational programs and activities. Quid pro quo sexual harassment and hostile sexual environment (including bullying) constitute forms of gender-based discrimination, and a college or university that fails to properly and adequately respond to such allegations violates Title IX and is at risk of losing its federal assistance. This federal assistance includes grants, loans, and tuition payments made with federal funds, to name a few examples. Through the webinar, Ms. Foster will help participants better understand the concepts of quid pro quo sexual harassment and hostile sexual environment, and will cover some nuts-and-bolts policies, procedures, and preventative measures any college or university can develop to properly address allegations of sexual harassment and minimize its occurrence.

“Sexual harassment,” stated Ms. Foster, “at colleges and universities is a very real concern. It affects every campus, small or large, across the country and the advent of technologies such as YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook have only compounded the challenges faced by leadership at these institutions in navigating the handling of sexual harassment complaints. In fact, many campus professionals are at a loss as to how to properly recognize and resolve sexual harassment complaints and, often, they don’t have measures in place to prevent harassment from occurring in the first place. The nationally-recognized trial involving Jerry Sandusky and Penn State’s response to allegations of sexual harassment shed light on how critical this complex issue has become. That is why we developed this webinar. Keeping leadership, policymakers, faculty, and staff up-to-date in this area of the law is critical to the health of any institution of higher learning. Our training has been described as “top-of-the-line” and that is what we deliver the participants of this Webinar.”

Participants can get more information and register for the webinar by visiting http://www.titleviconsulting.com and clicking on the ‘Webinar’ tab.
Ms. Foster is available for media interviews and can be reached using the information below or by email at seena@titleviconsulting.com. ‘Civil Rights Investigations Under The Workforce Investment Act And Other Title VI-Related Laws’ is available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble throughhttp://www.outskirtspress.com/civilrights. More information is available at Seena Foster’s website.

Profile:

Seena Foster, award winning author and Partner of the discrimination consulting firm, Title VI Consulting, LLP in Alexandria, Virginia, provides expertise and guidance in the areas of compliance and civil rights investigations to state and local governments, colleges and universities, private companies, and non-profit organizations. To that end, she offers one hour webinars, full-day and half-day in-person training sessions, and mediation services addressing a variety of types of discrimination such as racial discrimination, sex discrimination, disability discrimination, age discrimination, and religious discrimination. The federal law on discrimination is complex and affects our workplaces as well as the delivery of our federally funded programs and activities. Her book, “Civil Rights Investigations Under the Workforce Investment Act and Other Title VI Related Laws: From Intake to Final Determination”, has been described as an “eye-opening” reading experience and a “stand-alone” training resource. Ms. Foster’s resources and materials are designed to support the work of civil rights and discrimination professionals in the public and private sectors.

Contact:

Seena Foster
www.titleviconsulting.com
seena@titleviconsulting.com

Attorney Seena Foster, Award Winning Author of ‘Civil Rights Investigations’, Announces New Webinar for Administrators of Federally Assisted Programs

Saturday, September 1st, 2012
Photo of Seena Foster

Attorney Seena Foster, Award Winning Author of 'Civil Rights Investigations', Announces New Webinar for Administrators of Federally Assisted Programs

The recurring training webinar titled ‘Compliance With Title VI of the Civil Rights Act and Related Laws: An Overview’, provides information on how to comply with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of federal civil rights laws that apply to the administration, oversight, and delivery process for federally assisted programs and activities.

[Washington DC August 21, 2012] Seena Foster, attorney and award winning author of ‘Civil Rights Investigations Under The Workforce Investment Act And Other Title VI-Related Laws’, recently announced the next date for ‘Compliance With Title VI of the Civil Rights Act and Related Laws: An Overview’, an online webinar that provides information on how to comply with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of federal civil rights laws that apply to the administration, oversight, and delivery process for federally assisted programs and activities. The webinar will be presented on September 20, 2012 at 1pm EST.

This webinar will be especially helpful to state and local government officials from any size agency or department, including equal opportunity officers, ADA coordinators, disability specialists, Title VI liaisons, agency heads, contracting and procurement personnel, and compliance officials. Management and equal opportunity professionals for private companies and other organizations that contract with state and local governments to operate federally assisted programs and activities can also benefit. Participants who complete the webinar will receive a personalized “Certificate of Completion” documenting the training.

“Government agencies,” stated Ms. Foster, “educational institutions, and private sector companies are under increased pressure to comply with extensive civil rights laws. They must understand what the laws are, what they require, and how to develop and implement measures ensuring compliance to avoid litigation or loss of funding. With a background in civil rights compliance and conducting discrimination complaint investigations, we know how to present information in a way that professionals at any level of an organization will understand and be able to use. These webinars are one avenue of introducing the requirements of civil rights laws in the workplace and in the operation of government programs. During our webinars, we present nuts-and-bolts steps to take for ensuring compliance and we have the expertise to conduct on-site policy reviews and training, which provide more in-depth coverage of civil rights issues. From our experience in the field, it is clear that government agencies, educational institutions, and private sector companies face serious challenges in getting people trained and keeping their leadership, policymakers, and staff up-to-date in the area of civil rights. That’s why they turn to us. This is what we do best.”

Participants can get more information and register for the webinar by visiting http://www.titleviconsulting.com and clicking on the ‘Webinar’ tab.

Ms. Foster is available for media interviews and can be reached using the information below or by email at seenafoster@aol.com. ‘Civil Rights Investigations Under The Workforce Investment Act And Other Title VI-Related Laws’ is available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble through http://www.outskirtspress.com/civilrights. More information is available at Seena Foster’s website.

Profile:

Seena Foster, award winning author and Partner of the discrimination consulting firm, Title VI Consulting, LLP in Alexandria, Virginia, provides expertise and guidance in the areas of compliance and civil rights investigations to state and local governments, colleges and universities, private companies, and non-profit organizations. To that end, she offers one hour webinars, full-day and half-day in-person training sessions, and mediation services addressing a variety of types of discrimination such as racial discrimination, sex discrimination, disability discrimination, age discrimination, and religious discrimination. The federal law on discrimination is complex and affects our workplaces as well as the delivery of our federally funded programs and activities. Her book, “Civil Rights Investigations Under the Workforce Investment Act and Other Title VI Related Laws: From Intake to Final Determination”, has been described as an “eye-opening” reading experience and a “stand-alone” training resource. Ms. Foster’s resources and materials are designed to support the work of civil rights and discrimination professionals in the public and private sectors.

Contact:

Seena Foster
www.titleviconsulting.com
www.seenafoster.com
seena@titleviconsulting.com

CERTIFICATE WEBINARS NOW OFFERED!

Thursday, August 2nd, 2012

We are pleased to announce our upcoming Webinars. Participants completing a Webinar will receive a personalized “Certificate of Completion” documenting the training.

Title: Compliance With Title VI of the Civil Rights Act
and Related Laws: An Overview
Date: Thursday, September 20, 2012
Time: 1:00 pm Eastern Standard Time
Cost: $34.95
Description:
Because of its popularity, this recurring Webinar provides an informative overview of how to comply with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of federal civil rights laws that apply to the administration, oversight, and delivery process for federally assisted programs and activities. In this Webinar, we’ll focus our attention on Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and the disability-related nondiscrimination laws at Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and Title II of the Americans With Disabilities Act. We will touch on a variety of compliance-related issues such as how far these laws extend, what is required for compliance (including a discussion of reasonable accommodation, environmental justice, and Limited English Proficiency), the concepts of assurances and taglines, differences between program complaints and discrimination complaints, harassment and hostile environment, and data collection.
Developed for:
Whether you are new, or need refresher training, this Webinar is designed for state and local government officials from any size agency or department, including equal opportunity officers, ADA coordinators, disability specialists, Title VI liaisons, agency heads, contracting and procurement personnel, and compliance officials. Similarly, management and equal opportunity professionals for private companies and other organizations that contract with state and local governments to operate federally assisted programs and activities will find this Webinar useful. Whether you receive funding directly from a federal agency, or indirectly through a state or local agency, the laws discussed in the Webinar apply to you.

Title: Sexual Harassment at Educational Institutions: An Overview of Policies and Preventative Measures
Date: Thursday, October 25, 2012
Time: 1:00 pm Eastern Standard Time
Cost: $34.95
Description:
In the course of this Webinar, we will use the sexual harassment case involving Jerry Sandusky and Penn State as an example of some concrete steps any educational institution can take in developing policies and implementing preventative measures to prevent sexual harassment. The events leading up to the conviction of Mr. Sandusky involved use of university facilities to engage in sexual behavior with minors. We will cover The Clery Act as well as Title IX of the Education Amendments Act, which is the federal civil rights law that prohibits sex-based discrimination in federally assisted educational programs and activities.
Developed for:
This Webinar is designed for equal opportunity, human resource, and affirmative action personnel at educational institutions as well as the leadership, policy-makers, faculty, staff, and students at these institutions.

Seena Foster is an attorney, certified mediator, and award-winning author of “Civil Rights Investigations Under the Workforce Investment Act and Other Title VI-Related Laws: From Intake to Final Determination.” And, she is a Partner with Title VI Consulting in Alexandria, VA. You may visit her website at www.titleviconsulting.com.